Deputy Chief Constable Adam Cunningham

 

dam Cunningham was a member of the Peeblesshire Constabulary for forty-one years, being Sergeant c1877 and appointed Deputy Chief Constable between 1877 and his death in 1881, in his 66th year.

Superintendent Dickson

 
 

 
 

r Dickson, a native of Peebles, was appointed Superintendent of Police and Deputy Chief Constable for Peeblesshire in October, 1897, in room of the late Mr James Arrol. His father was for many years tenant of Standalane Farm, and on his death, Mr Dickson joined the

police force under Captain Munro in Edinburgh.

 

He was afterwards drafted to Penicuik, Dalkeith, Mid-Calder, etc. Appointed detective county officer for Midlothian County, he was shortly afterwards promoted to the rank of Sergeant of police at Portobello, whence he was drafted to Peebles c1894.

 

Superintendent James Attridge

 

native of Berwick, Mr James Attridge joined the Royal Artillery when 14 years of age and served for 12 years. On his discharge he joined the Peeblesshire Constabulary in 1908 and was stationed at Innerleithen until 1912, when he was transferred to

Blythe Bridge.

 

When the 1914-18 war broke out he was recalled to Peebles, where he remained until the cessation of hostilities. He was next posted to Eddlestone and in 1923 was recalled to Peebles as office clerk.

 

When Sergeant Richardson retired from the Force at Innerleithen in 1927, he was promoted Sergeant and took over the control of the Innnerleithen office. From 1933, on the recommendation of Major Sholto W Douglas, C.B.E.,

 
 

 

D.S.O., Chief Constable of the Lothians and Peeblesshire, he was appointed Inspector and Deputy Chief Constable of the County. In July 1938 he was promoted Superintendent. While Inspector, in 1936, he was one of those chosen to represent Scottish Police at the funeral of King George.

 

Superintendent Attridge retired in 1944 for health reasons after 36 years of service with Peeblesshire Constabulary. He was also the Controller of A.R.P. for Peeblesshire.

Superintendent Thomas Meikle

 

nspector Thomas Meikle, a native of Korkliston, succeeded Superintendent and Deputy Chief-Constable James Attridge as head of the Peeblesshire Constabulary on 15 March 1944. The new "Chief", like Superintendent Attridge, had risen from the ranks. He started his Peeblesshire Police career at Innerleithen in May 1912, was promoted Sergeant in February, 1930 and attained the rank of

Inspector in June, 1939.

Inspector James Robb

 

armyllie-born Inspector Jarnes Robb, retired in July 1953. In 1946, while still a sergeant, Inspector Robb and another inspector went to arrest a former Polish soldier who had killed his wife, a Peebles woman.

 

They entered the house where the killer was staying, and just as they were about to arrest him he pulled out an automatic. He aimed it at Inspector Robb and pulled the trigger. For one moment Inspector Robb thought that he would never see his retirement. But there was only a click. The last bullet in the magazine had been knocked out when the suspect loaded the automatic. "We afterwards found it on the hearth rug." said Inspector Robb.

Constable John Smith

 

olice Constable David Smith died suddenly at his home, 30 January 1950. Constable Smith was a member of the administrative staff at Police Headquarters and had been at work that day but left about 1 p.m. not feeling very well. Death was due to heart failure.

 

Constable Smith, who was in his 48th year, had a long connection with the police. He was a native of Argyllshire but spent most of his early life in Peeblesshire where his father had taken up residence. He joined the Constabulary in 1926 but resigned the same year to join the West Lothian Constabulary, from which he was transferred to Midlothian in 1932. Three years later, as the result of losing an eye in an accident, he resigned but in December 1939, he joined West Lothian Constabulary as a war reserve and two years ago was transferred to the Regular Force.

Annual Reports of Chief Constable Sholto Douglas, C.B.E., D.S.O.

 
 

 
 
  1. 1919 Annual Report
  2. The total number of crimes and offences reported was 152 against 119 the previous year
  3. The number of persons apprehended or cited was 197 against 119 the previous year
  4. Seventy-seven or 39 per cent of the persons apprehended or cited, were known to be more or less under the influence of drink when the crimes or offences were committed
  5. During the year 101 persons were convicted, against 83 the previous year
  6. Fifty-two were convicted in Peebles Sheriff Court
  7. 27 were convicted in Peebles Police Court
  8. 22 were convicted in Innerleithen Police Court
  1. 1931 Annual Report
  2. The total number of crimes and offences reported was 268 against 266 the previous year
  3. The number of persons apprehended or cited was 267 against 285 in 1930
  4. In Peebles Sheriff, the number of persons tried was 125, of whom 116 were convicted
  5. In Peebles Police Court, 68 persons were tried, of whom 61 were convicted
  6. In Innerleithen Police Court, 28 persons were tried, of whom 27 were convicted
  7. In Peebles Justice of the Peace Court, 8 persons were tried, of whom 7 were convicted
  1. 1937 Annual Report
  2. The total number of crimes and offences reported was 396, against 430 the previous year
  3. The number of persons apprehended or cited by the police was 379, against 371 the previous year
  4. The police patrol car covered 19,937 miles during the year, principally on road traffic duty
  5. 101 persons were reported by the patrol for Road Traffic offences
  1. 1938 Annual Report
  2. The total number of crimes and offences reported during the year was 427, against 396 the previous year
  3. The number of persons apprehended or cited was 399, against 379 the previous year
  4. Ninety-six or near 24 per cent of the persons apprehended or cited, were known to be more or less under the influence of drink when the crimes or offences were committed
  5. The total number of convictions was 349, an increase of 19 compared with the previous year
  6. There was one fatal road accident and 45 non-fatal road accidents
  7. The patrol car covered 21,899 miles, principally on road traffic duty
  8. 72 persons were reported by the patrol car for road traffic offences
  9. In the Sheriff Court at Peebles, 71 persons were tried, of whom 69 were convicted
  10. In the Justice of the Peace Court at Peebles, 97 persons were tried, of whom 96 were convicted
  11. In the Police Court at Peebles, 159 persons were tried, of whom 157 were convicted
  12. In the Innerleithen Police Court, 27 persons were tried and convicted
  13. The police inquired into 14 cases of suspected anthrax, two cases of suspected swine fever and four cases of tuberculosis
  14. The arrival of 709 head of cattle imported from Ireland and Canada was verified and reported upon
  15. There were 196,386 sheep dipped in the first and 143,502, in the second prescribed dipping period
  1. 1939 Annual Report
  2. The number of crimes and offences reported was 367, a decrease of 60
  3. The number of persons apprehended or cited was 327, a decrease of 72
  4. Fatal road accidents numbered four and non-fatal accidents 50, while an additional 91 road accidents not involving personal injury were reported on by the police
  1. 1942 Annual Report
  2. The total number of crimes and offences reported during the year was 231, against 308 the previous year
  3. The number of persons apprehended or cited was 216, as against 266 the previous year
  4. In the course of the report, the Chief Constable pays a warm tribute to the services rendered by the 68 Special Constables enrolled. During the year, 13 members of the "Specials" wre awarded the Special Constabulary Long Service Medal. He states

 

The part-time service of the members is of considerable value, and I would like to take this opportunity of placing on record an appreciation of their services to the community.


 
  1. Other Officers
  2. Superintendent Forbes W. Leslie, Deputy Chief Constable, c1935 - 1940
  3. Constable John Drummond, resigned 27 November 1934

 

 

Above: Funeral of Deputy Chief Constable George Hodge, of Peebleshire Constabulary. The cortege is here seen passing over the Old Bridge of Peebles after leaving the police office. (1931)


Sources
  1. Deputy Chief Constable Adam Cunningham
    Southern Reporter, 8 December 1881 - The British Newspaper Archive
  2. Superintendent Dickson
    Dundee Evening Telegraph, 21 October 1897 - The British Newspaper Archive
    Dundee Advertiser, 8 October 1897 - The British Newspaper Archive
  3. Superintendent James Attridge
    Southern Reporter, 24 February 1944 - The British Newspaper Archive
    Berwickshire News and General Advertiser, 2 December 1947 - The British Newspaper Archive
  4. Superintendent Thomas Meikle
    Southern Reporter, 2 March 1944 - The British Newspaper Archive
  5. Inspector James Robb
    The Courier and Advertiser, 31 July 1953 - The British Newspaper Archive
  6. Constable John Smith
    Linlithgowshire Gazette, 3 February 1950 - The British Newspaper Archive
  7. Chief Constable Sholto Douglas, C.B.E., D.S.O.
    The Sketch, 11 October 1933 - The British Newspaper Archive
  8. 1919 Annual Report
    The Scotsman, 19 February 1920 - The British Newspaper Archive
  9. 1931 Annual Report
    Southern Reporter, 21 January 1932 - The British Newspaper Archive
  10. 1937 Annual Report
    Southern Reporter, 20 January 1938 - The British Newspaper Archive
  11. 1938 Annual Report
    The Scotsman,21 January 1939 - The British Newspaper Archive
  12. 1939 Annual Report
    Southern Reporter, 18 January 1940 - The British Newspaper Archive
  13. 1942 Annual Report
    Southern Reporter, 21 January 1943 - The British Newspaper Archive
  14. Other Officers
    Linlithgowshire Gazette, 10 May 1940 - The British Newspaper Archive
    Dundee Evening Telegraph, 26 February 1937 - The British Newspaper Archive
  15. Deputy Chief Constable George Hodge
    Edinburgh Evening News, 6 October 1931 - The British Newspaper Archive


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